Cindalynn’s Success Story

Cindalynn Hatton was enrolled as a Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Youth program participant at the Haywood Community Learning Center (HCLC) in Waynesville, NC. The Center is not a school but an alternative out of school program with a focus on WIA case management of the participants. The Center is partially supported through WIA funding provided by the Southwestern Commission’s Southwestern Workforce Development Board.

Cindalynn had a baby as a teen, and she was receiving no guidance or assistance from anyone. When her baby was six-months-old, she dropped out of the Haywood Early College program in order to work full-time to support her family. At that time, she met with the staff of the HCLC, who enrolled her in WIA case management. There, her basic and educational needs were assessed, and she was able to attend classes on a flexible schedule that was customized for her busy schedule. Cindalynn graduated from the learning center in June 2012, and she later graduated from Haywood Community College in in May 2015. This May, she will be graduating from Western Carolina University with a bachelor’s degree in molecular biology. She was accepted to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, where she plans to continue her education and eventually become a pharmacist.

The success of the Center is related to the availability of wrap-around services provided through many partners (faith-based, CBO, school systems, WIA, etc.,) and the flexibility and access to academic learning. The program is customized to each student and his or her barriers, rather than forcing the student to customize their schedule to the program. This increases the chances of the student successfully completing the program with a high school diploma and then continuing their education, entering the military, or gaining employment. This story is an excellent reminder that when you match the right person with the right program and staff, anything is possible.

For more information on Cindalynn’s story and the HCLC, click here to read the article in The Mountaineer.